THIS IS THE FIRST GUEST POST BY A VERY AMAZING GENTLEMAN, WHO HAPPENS TO BE A SPECIAL FRIEND OF MINE. ITS VERY REFLECTIVE NATURE IS ASTOUNDING! DO DROP A COMMENT!

Image result for image of a farm
Religion, faith, beliefs, societal values, morals and even law revolves around the fact that man is a guardian of all creation. Man is seen as the caretaker of the universe- one whom the world is kept in trust with- where the strongest is charged with the protection of the weakest. Or so it should be.
This school of thought tends to take this writer to a philosophical lab where logic will be employed. 

Before his binoculars is a hip of decadence confronting the bio; global warming is tied off warning, oil spillages entertaining the aqua, deforestation giving a clean Berbers cut to our Savannah. 

Oh! How novel these errs are, due to the mindlessness of the keeper.
Has man failed in his primary assignment, he wonders?
However, a greater defect catches the writer’s gaze. It is the fact that Man has become bad to Man. Man no longer regards his fellow Man as a venture to break sweat over; carnage is reported a few meters away, yet all remains calm with him because the hole is not on his part of the boat. It is now believable when we the society hears stories like Man killed Man over trivial issues. It is now a norm for Man to hate Man for reasons like colour, religion, tribe, country, social status.
Stories of heroes we goggled over as children, which we still tell to our children that portray strength and resilience, freedom and equality, harmony and equity is being ridiculed by the acts of hypocrisy. 

So, when the children fight for equality or freedom or equity, Man says things like ‘There are no Saviours out there. Don’t play Jesus. Superheroes don’t exist.’ Oh! How easily he forgets the heroes that fought against slavery, against apartheid, against chaos, against injustice.
Oh Man! Lick your hypocritical wounds, the writer cried.
As he dropped his binoculars, the writer is reminded of a story which his father fed him as breakfast during the rainy days of his childhood.
It was about a corn farmer. This farmer has only one competitor- the farmer adjacent his farm. Every planting season, he shared his good seeds with his neighbour competitor. 

One day, a stranger walked up to him and asked why he empowered his competitor, knowing how bad that can be in business.
‘You should frustrate him out of business,’ the man said. ‘You can have monopoly over planting these seeds if you watch him die. All you have to do is watch him lack seeds and give none to him.’
The farmer thought for a moment and said to the stranger, ‘Do you know about pollination?’
The stranger shook his head no.
The farmer then explained to the good man about seed reproduction, and how the wind, animals and man aid in this process. How one corn is dependent on another to grow. He went on to add that if his neighbor had bad seeds, it was only a matter of time before they all had bad seeds.
And he said, ‘That, my friend, is worst for business.’
The writer smiled at this story, just as he always does whenever he remembers it.
And today, as he lays on his deathbed, holding the hand of his dearest son, he whispered fervently,
‘Do we still use a word like ‘I’ when a better one like ‘WE’ exists?’
And as this dearest son who was my father always said…
‘Be the farmer.’

WRITTEN BY ICHABA IDOKO .

EDITED BY EIKOJONWA .

 

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